2021-2021 Master Thesis Topics
(Already Selected)

Here is the list of topics which are already selected by students for their master thesis

2021_001

Field of Study:

Follow the waste of electrical and electronic equipment

Logistics - information systems

Contact Details:

Terje Andersen

Background: The amount of   waste from electrical and electronic equipment are increasing (Andersen, Jæger & Mishra 2020). There is a growing need to implement circular   economy solutions ideally replacing the waste. Problems: It is only limited   knowledge on the actual reverse supply chain of electrical waste. In order to   move towards a circular economy, there is a need for information of waste   flow.

Approach: Explore the flow of waste by a case study following the waste   through the reverse supply chain in a Lean Gemba Walk approach used for the   extended supply chain.

Students: This thesis is suitable for students with   knowledge of logistics and supply chain management.

Advisor: Please contact   PhD student Terje Andersen

References: Andersen, T., Jæger, B., & Mishra, A. (2020). Circularity in   Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Directive. Comparison of a   Manufacturer’s Danish and Norwegian Operations. Sustainability, 12(13), 5236.   (See also references within this paper)

Selected By:

2021_002

Field of Study:

Heuristics for Binary Integer Programming Problems

Optimization

Contact Details:

Lars Magnus Hvattum

Several logistical challenges can be modelled as pure binary integer programming (BIP) problems. Examples include facility location problems, cutting stock problems, facility location problems, and airline crew scheduling, in addition to many other planning problems. The resulting problems are hard to solve, and heuristic solution methods are often developed for the particular problem class at hand. Few attempts have been made to create heuristic solvers for the general BIP.

This topic is to implement and test different metaheuristic ideas for solving BIPs, either based on population search, constructive heuristics, or local search heuristics. Some of the ideas to be tested involve using prediction methods and classification methods, either based on machine learning methods or statistical methods, within the heuristic search. This topic is suitable for a group of students with good programming skills and a willingness to learn more about heuristic solution methods

Selected By:

Mark Drozd

2021_003

Field of Study:

Automated and optimized planning for traders of farmed fish – effect of uncertainty

Optimization

Contact Details:

Lars Magnus Hvattum, Johan Oppen, Arild Hoff

Molde University College is part of an innovation project (FishTraOpt) owned by the local company Maritech Systems and managed by the local research consultancy Møreforsking. The goal of the project is to develop and test a prototype solver for the planning problem faced by traders of farmed fish.

To support the project, two potential topics for a master thesis are proposed this year: one focusing on the effect of uncertainty in the planning, and one focusing on the presence of multiple conflicting objectives in the planning.

The setting is that of a company that trades farmed fish. At any moment in time, the company has a forecast on the fish that will be harvested in the coming week. This involves knowing which types of fish are harvested (size, quality, certification, health issues), and the quantity of each type. The quality of this forecast improves as time passes.

There are several production sites, where the fish is also packed for transportation. Demand comes from both regular customers and through a spot market. These form orders, based on different types and quantities of fish. There may be some flexibility in these orders.

The basic planning problem is therefore a type of assignment problem: fish is available in different types and quantities from the producers, which must be matched with the demands of the customers. However, there are several complicating factors, such as the inability to perfectly match supply and demand on a given day.

The uncertainty in the problem is partly due to the supply being unknown: the size of the fish can only be determined once it has been harvested, and therefore it is also unknown which categories of fish can be sold (e.g., fish with a weight of 2-3 kilograms is a different category than fish with a weight of 3-4 kilograms). The price that can be obtained in the spot market is another factor where some uncertainty is present. A potential research question for a thesis is to investigate the importance of the uncertainty: does taking uncertainty into account help make better plans? Should a company invest in methods to reduce the uncertainty, and if so, how much could they improve their plans?

The topic can involve the following tasks: Discussing the problem with Møreforsking and writing a problem description. Formulating and implementing one or more mathematical models based on optimization under uncertainty. Performing computational experiments to evaluate the usefulness of taking into account uncertainty.

Selected By:

Jana Perednia

2021_004

Field of Study:

Machine learning used to improve discrete simulation of underwater waste distribution in oceans

Discrete event simulation and machine learning

Contact Details:

Steinar Kristoffersen

For the purposes of collecting and disposing of plastic garbage and ghost fishing tools such as nets and traps, we aim to combine discrete event simulation and machine learning to predict where artefacts of various kinds are most likely to gather underwater. The problem is that manual inspection of vast areas of ocean space will require excessive cost for most corporations, municipalities and even nations. Combined techniques need to be applied to pinpoint the most likely locations, and machine learning may iteratively contribute to improve each simulation as data is collected from the designated sites using underwater drones. The result of the thesis work could be a concrete set of simulations for a concrete area of ocean, with intermediate steps between in which machine learning demonstrably was is applied to improve precision of the next search.

Selected By:

Farhad Nourafshan

2021_005

Field of Study:

Legislation and law for the supply chain of ocean waste

Supply chain management

Contact Details:

Steinar Kristoffersen

There is a common understanding of excessive pollution of the world’s oceans. The equivalent of a 54 000 meter tall skyscraper made out of waste is allegedly tipped into the oceans every year. Once it ends in the ocean, it is hardly retrievable. This project seeks out which contractual obligations commonly exist between parties of the supply chain which transforms raw materials into services and consumer products. The objective is to point out the need for more definitive legislation, regulation and enforcing of obligations to recover waste, and distribute the cost fairly in a model of the supply chain.

Selected By:

Jaroslav Heggdal

2021_006

Field of Study:

A sustainable business model innovation for drones used in ocean waste collection

Supply chain management

Contact Details:

Steinar Kristoffersen

It is currently highly unlikely that the world’s oceans can be searched, and waste retrieved in any efficient manner using traditional vessels. The spaces are vast. Unless on beaches and in gyres, it is hardly visible in spite of its total volume. In gyres, albeit characterized as islands of debris, the concentration of plastic can vary from 100 down to 10 kilograms per square kilometers which means that recovering it, would require an immense financial investment if it were to be centralized. Decentralizing monitoring, identifying and collecting debris in local waters, however, seems technically and financially feasible, except that there is no scalable business model or motivation that is broadly compelling enough to encourage every citizen to deploy probes and drones to contribute to the global chore. Thus, this master project sets out to explore and exploit peer funding and sharing economy models as an alternative paradigm, to sustain totally decentralized collection of debris from fjords and oceans using nano-underwater drones. The complete value proposition needs to be assessed and a strategy for long-term supply chain development proposed to deal with the environmental challenges.

Selected By:

Øystein Henriksen

2021_007

Field of Study:

Sustainable city development and citizen participation

Logistics

Contact Details:

Steinar Kristoffersen

Smart city development project have become commonplace, and most employ what is popularly known as “the quadruple helix”. This master research project empirically examines previous and ongoing smart city projects, to find out of the design thinking of citizens actually manage to become the voice of the city and it inhabitants, compared to the systematic planning made by the municipality’s politicians and bureaucrats. The project will operationalize what makes cities “smart”, and suggest, if possible, a better approach to future sustainable cities planning.

Selected By:

Vilde Sønju Bårnes

2021_008

Field of Study:

Sports from the doorstep, spectator or participant

Logistics

Contact Details:

Steinar Kristoffersen

In most cities, amusements are mainly structured and systematic, even when there are possibilities to enjoy them freely from almost everybody’s doorstep. This creates travelling patterns, which may have to be changed in order for cities to become more human- and environmentally friendly. For instance, running can be performed virtually everywhere, but a large number of people travel to the gym to run on a treadmill. Horses might have had more space and attention of their owners in their owners’ gardens and yards, than they have in rented stables, still most owners travel far by car to see their horses. Climbing centres indoor replicate structures that are freely found outside, creating a need for transport, parking, utilities such as ventilation, electricity and water, etc.  In both an environmental and a health-and well-being perspective, could other sports take back their natural arenas in ways similar to parkour and skateboarding, rather than continuing to optimize convenient execution of swimming, downhill cycling and the simulated experience of climbing trees in a ”park”, at the cost of common and flexible cityscapes? What are the better trade-offs between our transport systems, places of living and the sports with which we engage? This thesis project explores the limits of de-industrializing sport.

Selected By:

Jonas Øverdahl Perkis

2021_009

Field of Study:

Environmental footprint consequences of using more marine ingredients for feeding in aqua culture

Informatics, sustainability, smart cities and innovation, mobile IT, autonomous vehicles and embedded/ubiquitous computing, information systems development

Contact Details:

Steinar Kristoffersen

There is an ambition to greatly increase the capacity of the Norwegian aqua culture sector. The Norwegian innovation system, epecially the TTOs (technology transfer offices) currently work together the double the salmon stocks several times over, which means that new feed ingredients are called for. One alternative is meso-pelagic spieces, such as Maurolicus muelleri ("laksesild", or pearlside).

The problem is that albeit the marine stocks of pearlside are massive, its role in the ecosystem is less understood. Moreover, it is troublesome to harvest, since it spoils easily, the waste blocks equipment and pumps and onshore the strains and sorting usually is too couarsly calibrated. In addition, the harvesting season falls alongside more profitable spiecies to catch for the ship owners.

We aim in this project to be assembling the equations needed to model the alternative fisheries, stabilizing catches, keeping and sorting the resources, etc. opposite the benefits of increased yields froma aqua culture in order to calculate precisely the environmental footprint consequences of using more marine ingredients for feeding in aqua culture. The results may contribute to revolutionize the entire industry, not only in terms of realizing its growth potential, but also to indicate limitations and possibilities of alternative means of farming, such as on-shore farms or offshore floating barges.

motivating problem: Some marine resources seem plentiful for a great increase of aqua culture yields in Norway. However, as long as the environmental footprint is unknown, the required supply  chain will not be supported by the stakeholders. This research aim to be making a unique contribution towards formally modelling and quantifying the environmental impact of  marine harvesting, using logistical methods.

Selected By:

2021_010

Field of Study:

The role of automated parcel lockers in e-commerce pickup/deliveries

Transportation Economics

Contact Details:

Edoardo Marcucci

Home deliveries are the preferred delivery option of online consumers but they are not sustainable in the long term. They are very expensive and increase freight traffic while not necessarily decreasing shopping travel. Deliveries to a locker in an automated parcel station (APS) could be a more sustainable alternative but this solution is not very popular. Only a small percentage of online consumers had at least one delivery delivered to such a locker in 2015. This thesis investigates: a) how citizens perceive this solution, b) what they like and dislike about it, c) how their perception depends on their location and availability, d) what is the role of ancillary services linked to this type of delivery. The candidate will have to define and carry out a filed survey to acquire the necessary data and elaborate them to determine the main drivers capable of explaining consumers’ perception of this delivery/pickup technique. The results derived will be useful to determine the relative attractiveness of the delivery/pickup technique with respect to various e-commerce-related items and, possibly, estimate the environmental, economic and financial implications this might have.

The goal is to provide support for decision making by offering a consumer perspective. From this perspective, the thesis should provide recommendations of how public procurement of parcel lockers can be conducted, in terms of developing specifications.

Selected By:

Erlend Vevatne

2021_011

Field of Study:

E-groceries, purchasing behaviour and sentiment analysis

Urban freight transportation

Contact Details:

Edoardo Marcucci

The information age has increased the use of internet by people. At present, people have started to shop consistently online including groceries. The online stores provide different options for the shipment of goods such as pick up from a local store, pick up from a general point, and home delivery. During a purchase, many people post their opinions online in social media while companies also post different offers for online purchasing. This provides a lot of unexplored information which, when converted to knowledge will help to shape the logistical movement of the future. In short, the thesis is designed with the use of text mining concept to understand and predict the future of logistics movement in online grocery shopping.

Selected By:

Muhammad Awais Raza

2021_012

Field of Study:

Application of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Supplier Risk Management

Logistics and IT

Contact Details:

Alok Mishra

Supplier and supply-chain risk management has risen up the agenda as business has become faster moving, more complex and global. AI will help organisations to make sense of the huge amount of data and information available and that could help in terms of risk management. AI can be used in supplier risk management to monitor and identify potential risk positions across the supply chain. For example, Risk methods identifies new and emerging supply chain risk events by handling data gathered from different sources, helping to identify emerging risks faster. Data analysis and making decisions on time will facilitate organizations in best decision making and in saving time and cost in its operations. There are many approaches to be considered for instance Petri nets, multi-agent systems, automated reasoning and machine learning etc.

Selected By:

2021_013

Field of Study:

Smart Procurement Adoption in Vendor Management

Logistics and IT

Contact Details:

Alok Mishra

The use of AI in procurement and supply chain management is still in the early stages. AI in vendor management has great potential. In procurement it can provide a more modern, more effective, and intelligent technique of streamlining business processes. It can help in greater automation of procurement tasks, better visibility, strategic sourcing, etc. AI tools that will indeed start to impact on these issues – strategic sourcing and supplier management, identifying innovation in the supply chain, and true supply chain risk management.

Selected By:

Muhammad Hassan Iftikhar

2021_014

Field of Study:

Digitalization and Invoice Management

Logistics and IT

Contact Details:

Alok Mishra

Contracting is a common activity, but it is one that few companies do efficiently or effectively. In fact, it has been estimated that inefficient contracting causes firms to lose between 5% to 40% of value on a given deal, depending on circumstances. But recent technological developments like Digitalization and artificial intelligence (AI) are now helping companies overcome many of the challenges to contracting. AI is likely to play a role at every stage of the contract management process. It is already being used to search the existing contracts in organisations for terms and conditions that may carry a risk for the buyer. It will also support the drawing up of new contracts, suggesting appropriate clauses and conditions. Then AI will identify the information needed from the supplier to manage the contract and performance, and ensure this is captured, recorded and reported. And there will be no risk of missing key dates such as a notice to terminate – AI will provide calendar alerts.

Selected By:

2021_015

Field of Study:

Software Services for the Circular Economy

Logistics and IT

Contact Details:

Alok Mishra

Natural resources are finite and when we junk electrical items such as mobile phones, white goods and other technological devices, it releases toxic waste into the atmosphere. Most of the component parts are not bio-degradable, meaning they sit on top of the earth rather than being broken down and absorbed back into the ecosystem. Biological ecosystems already operate on a cyclical basis and experts believe that humanity needs to adopt this same approach in order to reduce the impact our current throw-away culture is having on the environment. We need to operate in an economy that priorities the principles of ‘reduce, reuse and recycle’ rather than ‘take, make and dispose.’ “If the production model is based on the circular economy, then you only produce what you know you can recycle… It works on planet Earth in the ecosystem.

Software supports circular economy; at the same time the instruments of circular economy serve as tools for circular software development.  Digitization, Big Data and other software solutions mainly as enablers for circular economy. For many of these business models, software is very valuable – because it is about decoupling the required use from the need of additional resources. Knowing exactly what materials and components the products are made of is becoming increasingly important. Only in this way can the individual components be reused or recycled.  This work will explore different ways, models, frameworks and strategies in this regard.

Selected By:

2021_016

Field of Study:

Digital Transformation Management in Logistics Sector

Logistics, Management, IT

Contact Details:

Alok Mishra

The path to increased operational efficiency and customer satisfaction lies in the digitalization of logistics sector. Efficiency, optimization, speed and timing have always been critical in logistics and transportation. Today, amidst a range of accelerating evolutions and in an increasingly digital environment where digitalization are affecting the next revolution of industry, and moving towards Industry 4.0. There are many challenges in this digitalization process. Speed and time are always challenges in logistics and crucial towards competitive advantage and real-time economy. In the era of digital business, with evolution of new business models management of digitalization will contribute a major role towards customer-service, information management, data-driven manufacturing and marketing in the logistic sector.

Selected By:

Ehsan Alisaeedi

Rita Natwijuka

2021_025

Field of Study:

Blockchain Applications in Logistics

Logistics and IT

Contact Details:

Anolan Milanés and Johan Oppen

In recent years, cryptocurrencies and the blockchain have become technology trends. It wasn't long until several initiatives emerged to explore the blockchain technology in other areas, such as logistics and supply chain management. However, success stories in the use of blockchain by companies are not abundant in the Molde area. This project aims to study the viability of applying blockchain to streamline processes in companies in the region, particularly in the timber industry, comparing it with other possible solutions.

Selected By:

Haavard Olav Herness Lien

Damir Omér

2021_026

Field of Study:

Optimization in home care routing

Optimization, Healthcare logistics

Contact Details:

Sebastian Urrutia

Home care is an increasingly important component of modern health systems. The geographic distribution of the patients makes the planning and organization of home care systems more challenging than in the case of inpatient care. One of the main problems that arise in this setting is the home care routing problem, which deals with the assignment, scheduling, and routing of nurses to home care patients. In this project, we study and propose solution approaches to the home care routing problem in the Norwegian context. This rich optimization problem will be tackled considering objectives and restrictions observing the local regulations and policies. Depending on the evolution of the work, the implementation of the developed solutions in real situations is possible.

Selected By:

Bartosz Jerzy Zdunek

2021_028

Field of Study:

Modelling a periodic maritime inventory routing problem

Optimization

Contact Details:

Lars Magnus Hvattum, Sebastian Urrutia

The inventory routing problem (IRP) arises when a company is responsible for the transport of goods from a production site to consumption sites, as well as maintaining proper inventory levels throughout the supply chain. Maritime IRPs, where the transport is conducted by sea-going vessels, have been studied frequently. Typically, such IRPs are solved for a fixed time horizon. This leads to solutions with poor decisions near the end of the time horizon: production ports can be almost full and consumption ports can be almost empty, since this is consistent with the goal of minimizing total costs.

We would like to model a periodic maritime IRP, where the goal is to have a stable system: at the end of the planning horizon, all vessels and all inventory levels should be identical to where they started out. This ensures that the solution can be executed indefinitely, and there are no end-of-horizon effects. This task requires excellent skills in mathematical programming, and the use of AMPL or similar software.

Selected By:

Amir Zojaji

Kiarash Soltaniani

2021_029

Field of Study:

Product planning structure

Supply Chain Management

Contact Details:

Kristina Kjersem

Due to several merges that led to an increased number of product assortments, Mørenot AS needs to develop a common product structure that can be applied in their project planning. The company has several production facilities (delivering all products within the portfolio) so there is a need for a structure that can be used across all of them. At the same time, the company is preparing for an ERP upgrade and is looking for a product planning structure that can be tested and implemented from the beginning. Today, there are no international standards that can provide a functional subdivision of technical and financial information for the equipment industry. The main topic of this research is to identify a standardized product structure similar to the SFI grouping system used in shipbuilding industries. The proposed standardized product structure could potentially become a common coding and classification system for the case industry. The research will be conducted in close collaboration with the case company.

Selected By:

Sverre Sandnes Gjervik

Håvard Myrstrand Taklo

2021_030

Field of Study:

Optimizing warehouse and purchasing

Supply Chain Management

Contact Details:

Kristina Kjersem

Mørenot AS is a company that sells finished goods and produces several types of equipment for handling fish and for other aquaculture activities. Today they own several warehouse locations covering different parts of the operation. The company has identified several challenges in keeping an optimized stock level: long lead times, seasonal changes in customer demands as well as the demand for high service level and need for shorter lead times. The goal of this research is to find an inventory analysis method, that will ensure the correct stock level and by that improve the cash flow and reduce inventory waste.

Selected By:

Bereket Bassore

2021_031

Field of Study:

Logistics analysis (localizing, warehouse structure, central warehouse)

Supply Chain Management

Contact Details:

Kristina Kjersem

Mørenot AS owns several locations and production facilities in Norway, Europe, USA, and Asia. The central warehouse is located in Søvik, Norway. Mørenot AS organizes transport of products and materials between own locations leading to high cost and long lead times per product, especially when sending to the northern part of Norway. The topic of this research is to identify the current state and propose a more optimal solution that can improve the flow of materials and logistics company’s locations. The research will be conducted in close collaboration with the case company.

Selected By:

Konstanty Maciej Kwidzynski

2021_032

Field of Study:

Supply chain transformation for 3DKnit-technology enabled sustainable design-production at Ekornes and Devold of Norway

Supply Chain Management

Contact Details:

Deodat Mwesiumo, Hajnalka Vaagen

With the enabling digital technology 3dKnit (with integrated design, planning, production and reproduction functions), it is expected a move away from mass-produced products to fine-tuned-customization and on-demand production. The technology empowers people to become co-designers of the products they buy, it enables reduced consumption of raw materials through ‘zero-waste’ production and quick reproducibility, it eliminates the manual-labor intensive step in furniture and textiles production, sewing (which has led to outsourced production), and enables reduced time-to-market (which is so important in consumer industries). These properties are expected to lead to increased resource utilization, reduced production and consumption, while increasing profitability and job possibilities locally.

This project aims to develop knowledge on how the 3dKnit technology drives changes in the Ekornes and Devold supply chains in order to explore the sustainability potential, and what are the critical aspects and challenges involved in sustainable industrialization of the technology in a supply chain and system perspective.

This master thesis project is planned in parallel with NTNU student work on LCA studies (life cycle assessment) for chosen 3dKnit enabled design innovations at Ekornes and Devold.

Selected By:

Jonas Lie Norem

Jasetha Pushparajah